Home - Marine Pumps

Marine Pumps

Marine pumps keep water out of your boat and underneath it where it belongs. Sounds simple enough, but water splashing into the boat is not the only water marine pumps keep out...afterall, it rains! Humor aside, our biggest selling item is bilge pumps. But there are certainly plenty of other types to choose from like washdown pumps. And remember, a washdown pump comes in handy on those hot summer days to cool off without jumping in. Welcome to waterworld!


Ballast Pumps

Ballast Pumps

3 items
Bilge Pumps

Bilge Pumps

136 items
Livewell Pumps

Livewell Pumps

18 items
Mascerator Pump

Mascerator Pump

11 items
Oil Change Pumps

Oil Change Pumps

27 items
Washdown Pumps

Washdown Pumps

21 items
Water Pumps

Water Pumps

56 items


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Maritime Maintenance and Marine Pumps

There is a saying that the two happiest days in a man’s life are the day he buys his own boat and the day he sells it. While this may be a slight exaggeration on both ends, it is certainly true that sometimes things go wrong with boats. If you are like most boat owners, part of the fun of owning your own boat is fixing things yourself when you can. One common maintenance or repair issue is often with one of the many marine pumps found in boats. There are several different types of marine pumps that you will encounter. Ballast pumps, impeller pumps, livewell pumps, mascerator pumps, oil change pumps, washdown pumps, and water pumps are some of them. Any pump a boat has could need repair or replacement at any time. Luckily, Marine Supply Dock has a large selection of marine pumps, replacement parts, and repair kits.

Bilge Pumps

One of the most common types of is the bilge pump. The bilge is the lowest part of a boat. Since even the most seaworthy boats on the ocean tend to collect water in the bilge, a bilge pump is necessary to get rid of the water. They are not an optional part in a boat as too much water collected in a boat means a sunk boat. Bilge pumps come in both manual and electric varieties. Manual bilge pumps are not that common of a variety of marine pump anymore. They are found on both older and handmade boats. Some boats have them as a back up (especially sail boats). It is actually recommended by a lot of boat owners to go ahead and install a manual pump in addition to an electrical one. Being that boats are vehicles meant for water, it is all too frequent of an occurrence for the electrical system on a boat to go out. If there is no back up manual pump, water could collect to dangerous levels. People sometimes fear electric bilge pumps wondering if fuel accidentally mixes with the water, will a spark from the pump ignite things. While in the past this was a legitimate concern, these days they are made to operate without a spark for that reason.

Replacing Bilge Pumps

Smaller boats may have a smaller bilge area, but bilge pumps are just as important in small boats. The smaller capacity to hold water actually means that smaller boats can sink quicker than larger ones. The length of the boat determines what the output of the pump needs to be. The longer the boat length the more water the bilge should be able to handle. When it comes time to replace the bilge pump, you have to decide if the current size is enough for your boat or if you want to upgrade. If you want to keep the same capacity bilge pump, you must match up the hose and wire capacity. If your boat does not have a back up manual pump, you may think about adding one while you are replacing the electric one. When buying a new pump you will have to decide if you want one that you must switch on and off yourself, if you want one that switches on automatically. The automatic ones are very convenient, but they could leave you unaware of a small leak. There are some things that you want to keep in mind when installing your new bilge pump. First of all you don’t want the discharge hoses to be any longer than absolutely necessary. While corrugated hoses can be cheaper, smooth bore hoses work better. Another tip is to make sure your loop is vented. While doing repairs for yourself is great, always follow any manufacturer’s recommendations. That goes not only for bilge pumps, but also for any marine pumps. Also, for safety sake, if any wiring has connections in the actual bilge area, make absolutely sure to use waterproof butt connectors.