Home - Boating Safety

Boating Safety

Smart boaters put boating safety first before fun. Experienced boaters know anything can happen, and without solid boating safety measures, captain and crew are more at risk. The first place to start is life vests. Guests in particular might consider life vests an inconvenience, but captains know better. Although life rafts, safety lights and other safety items are equally important, first aid kits are mandatory. Make sure you know how to use the kits as well and don't just tuck them under a seat. Before leaving the dock with new boaters or experienced seamen, always discuss the location of all your safety gear so that in an emergency, everyone is aware of the boating safety gear you have and where to find it.


Epirbs & PLBs

Epirbs & PLBs

1 items
First Aid Kits

First Aid Kits

12 items
Horns

Horns

22 items
Life Rings

Life Rings

21 items
Life Vests

Life Vests

74 items
Safety Flags

Safety Flags

2 items
Safety Kits

Safety Kits

8 items
Safety Lights

Safety Lights

6 items


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BOATING SAFETY

There is no point in doing anything on a boat unless you take the time to do it right. -- Anonymous

Types of Safety procedures

As indicated by the heading safety can cover a broad if not endless range of topics. Our focus on boating safety is paramount as with all methods of transportation the result of not adhering to procedures and best practices normally result in death or permanent injury, physically and mentally.

Plan your trip or outing

Our first focus will be geared towards planning your trip or outing. Unlike land outings, marine trips can be extremely tricky. It is vitally important to file a float plan with your family or marina. The first problem is that our earth is covered in more water than land which can result in a vessel being stranded for days before being found if proper preparation was not made. What complicates the issue even more is that it doesn’t have to be a hi-jacking, a kidnapping or a robbery; it can be as simple as an engine failure which leaves you stranded. Boaters should ensure they create a comprehensive checklist which includes, but is not limited to:

• Checking vessel for physical damages, both internal and external. E.g. look for holes, cracks any breach of the surface.
A regular road user knows that tires leak, parts wear and accidents happen. The regular road user however, can step out of his vehicle and make repairs with little or no difficulty. The same can’t be said about boaters. That is why it is of paramount importance that the boating safety rules are applied to this aspect specifically. Do a comprehensive check of all areas of the boat to ensure there are no unwanted openings or leaks. If an opening is detected but does not seem to be an immediate threat – DO NOT – proceed on your voyage until it can be verified that it is of no danger or it can be repaired.

• Checking Fuel supply and Oil level
Think of the phrase, “Out to sea without a paddle”. That is the sort of situation that will occur if your boat is not properly supplied with oil and fuel. In addition to potential engine damage, this is a scary situation to be in. To help prevent an empty fuel tank, keep extra containers of oil and fuel readily available. These checks should be mandatory and inability to adhere to this common sense practice will result in a risky perhaps life alternating situation.

• Proper working navigation lights
A boater must check boat, whether planning for a voyage or merely docked, to ensure all navigation lights are working properly. Navigation lights are normally used between sunset and sunrise and each light has specific functions and specific placements and should always be on whether anchored or underway. The lights range depending on the size of the vessel but follow a similar principle. Get lights repaired or replaced before venturing on a journey as it can determine whether or not another vessel will collide with your own.

• Enough life jackets for each individual present on vessel
Life Jackets are important and knowing the type of life jacket to use is dependent on your intended route and the type of passengers.

Personal Floatation Devices (PFD) or Life Jackets can be found in four (4) classifications:

TYPE 1 PFD – This is the life jacket with the most buoyancy, as it is designed to float even a heavy non swimmer. It is easy to use and normally turns unconscious persons upward for longest survivability.
TYPE 2 PFD – This life jacket is normally used for calm, inland water where it is likely that persons will be rescued faster. The life jacket will turn some unconscious wearers but is not as complete as the TYPE 1 PFD.
TYPE 3 PFD – This is best for calm, inland water where persons can be rescued quickly, however it offers little buoyancy similar to the TYPE 2 PFD the major difference is that it can be worn for long periods of time while maintaining little discomfort.
TYPE 4 PFD – This is best for inland water with heavy traffic where a rescue is always possible. They are designed to be thrown to a conscious person. The above list is not by any means exhaustive and should only gear you towards acquiring more information into ensuring the safety of yourself and loved ones. It is never too late to start practising boat safety and start saving lives.